Our September issue is out now!





Our September issue is now in the shops and available digitally. Features include:

Photostory: Freeze Frame
A selection of winning entries from the 2013 Global Arctic Awards photographic competition, which highlights the diverse beauty of some of the coldest parts of the world

Getting brown and dirty
Nikolia Apostolou assesses the potential impacts of plans to privatise the lignite mining industry in Greece

Shoddy treatment                                                                                         
Mark Nelson discusses why the sewage-treatment approach to waste management in now outdated

Sustainability on the menu
Hazel Southam visits a restaurant in Wales whose use of local ingredients is helping to support smallholder agriculture.

Safe from harm
In Australia, a private conservation organisation is taking the lead in attempts to halt one of the worst extinction crises of modern times. Geordie Torr reports

Essential gear: An American odyssey
During his six-month trek along the USA's Pacific Crest Trail, Ian Mangiardi discovered that although his kit proved to be invaluable, his most important piece of gear was the head on his shoulders.

And don’t forget…
… our regular features including a round-up of the latest geographical and climate science news; a hotspot focus on Iraqi Kurdistan; tips on photographing Little owls; and lots, lots more

Buy your copy now, subscribe and save up to 35 per cent or call +44 (0)1635 588 496. Geographical is also available in WHSmith and many independent newsagents


Geographical resource

Browse, search and enjoy a range of news items and articles from past issues of Geographical magazine...

Pier Review

Some of Britain’s best-loved piers are undergoing multi-million-pound renovations. Others, like Eastbourne Pier, almost destroyed in a recent blaze, are at risk. Whether the future for piers is secure or uncertain, a new book showcased in August's issue celebrates their distinctive architecture and the pivotal role they’ve played in the history of British tourism and leisure.Read on

David Harvey

is one of the world's most influential geographers. Upon the publication of his latest book, Seventeen Contradictions and the End of Capitalism, he talks to Olivia Edward about his inspirations, observations and beliefsRead on

The green dragon awakens

China has achieved remarkable economic success following the principle of developing first and cleaning up later. But now the country with the world’s worst environmental record is changing its ways. Mark Rowe reportsRead on

Heat & dust

Offering guaranteed light, clear blue skies and interesting geometrical patterns, deserts are a photographer’s paradise – just beware the dreaded dust and sand, and don’t leave your camera in the sun, says Keith WilsonRead on

Skye three ways

Continuing his series of ‘microadventures’ around the British Isles, Alastair Humphreys headed to the Isle of Skye with the idea of cycling, climbing and kayaking his way around the spectacular island in 24 hoursRead on


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LITTLE THRILLS:
Regular Geographical contributor Alastair Humphreys has just released a new book called Microadventures. It's all about the simple, accessible adventures we can have close to home. We have five copies to give away

WHERE OH WHERE: It’s about twice the size of Wales; around 40 per cent of its people have declared they have no religion; and its lowest point is seven metres below sea level. Name the nation to be in with a chance of winning a Bradt travel guide of your choice

PIER REVIEW: Some of Britain’s best-loved piers are undergoing multi-million-pound renovations. Others, like Eastbourne Pier, almost destroyed in a recent blaze, are at risk. Whether the future for piers is secure or uncertain, a new book showcased in August's issue celebrates their distinctive architecture and the pivotal role they’ve played in the history of British tourism and leisure.